Benefect Botanical Disinfectants & Cleaners for the Insurance Restoration Industry

News


Superstorm Sandy and the Dangers Left Behind
posted on November 1, 2012 1:44 PM


The flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy is bad enough, but it’s only the beginning of the problems for some. Flooding and moisture brings toxic contamination. City sewage water backs up and mixes with the floodwater to become a toxic soup full of human pathogens. To compound the problem if the floodwater isn’t cleaned up within 48 hours, mold will also begin to grow.

Those evacuated from their homes want to return as quickly as they can but if the floodwaters haven’t receded, they are entering into areas heavily contaminated with microbial growth that can cause infection and disease. Simply not having the right protective equipment can leave people susceptible to a wide range of infections. Some can also have an allergic response simply from the bacteria and mold that has become airborne as a result of the flood.

For these reasons, it is very important that qualified Disaster Restoration contractors are contacted to clean up areas affected by flooding.

Any structure, whether it be a business or home, that has any amount of water in it is in danger of having microbial growth and proper precautions are necessary.  Flooding may only be a few inches but the increase in moisture levels can be all that is needed for mold to grow in a home. It’s one thing to clean up what you can see but as the Disaster Restoration contractor understands, it’s areas you can’t see, like behind drywall or on wood studs in the wall that provide an ideal food source for mold.

Disaster Restoration contractors understand biological contamination and are trained to route out problem areas. They also have equipment such as mold tests, air sampling tests, specialized cleaners and disinfectants to accurately handle the situation.

It is important to call your Insurance Company and use a certified Restoration Contractor to do the clean up so you and your family or business are safe.




< back to News page